Friday, May 5, 2017

Glass Houses


For John, BLUFOn the other hand, who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men, aside from the Shadow.  Nothing to see here; just move along.



In my previous Blog Post I mentioned a new book by British Author Douglas Murray.  Back in 2011 he wrote Bloody Sunday: Truths, Lies and the Saville Inquiry.  While it isn't the same spelling, it jogged my memory about the Jimmy Savile imbroglio and the fact that the famed and fabled Broadcasting House had hushed up Mr Savile's crimes.  Sir James Wilson Vincent Savile, OBE, KCSG.  So, today I saw this headline:
It isn't that Mr Mark Thompson was responsible for Sir Jimmy Savile's activities, but he was the Director-General of the BBC while the activities were being hushed up.  And yet he feels fit to go after Fox News and in a very aggressive fashion.

Here is the lede and next four paragraphs from a Reporter Miles Goslett item in Heat Street, yesterday.

Recent departures from Fox News after various accusations were levelled at high-profile figures reignites a matter of great importance concerning New York Times CEO Mark Thompson.

Thompson, who was director-general and editor-in-chief of the BBC in London before taking up his current post at the Times in 2012, has always maintained he knew nothing about the serial sexual abuse of children and young people committed by the former BBC presenter Jimmy Savile, who died aged 84 in October 2011.

Thompson says he first heard about this after leaving the BBC in September 2012.

However, a lot of evidence calls Thompson’s account into question.  In the present climate, with the Times leading the charge against Fox News, it is well worth going over this again.

It must be noted from the outset that it isn’t the case that Thompson could have personally stopped the abuse from occurring.  This is about Thompson’s personal integrity – a value which the Times holds dear.

Do I believe Mr Thompson should step down as President and CEO of The New York Times Company?  Yes.

Maybe he and Roger Ailes and Bill O'Reilly could all get together once a month for lunch in some swank Manhattan restaurant.

And, in the mean time, perhaps The Boston Globe can do a "Spotlight" story on the Old Gray Lady and its boss.

Hat tip to the InstaPundit.

Regards  —  Cliff

  And crimes they were, notwithstanding Wikipedia referring to them as a sexual abuse scandal.

No comments: