Thursday, October 2, 2014

Government Abuse of Power


For John, BLUFSo much for Free Speech.  Nothing to see here; just move along.



From the pages of The Washington Post we have an item on FCC regulation of broadcasting stations.  The story is about the FCC wanting to ban the use of the Football Team name "Redskins" (or Skins to those of us who have cheered them on in the past).  But this is the most disturbing part:
Washington insiders know that the FCC often regulates by a “raised eyebrow”; publicly telegraphing its concerns, and counting on broadcasters — fearful of delays or even failure to renew licenses — to take appropriate steps without the need for formal agency action.
Hat tip to the Instapundit.

Regards  —  Cliff

  If they want something to complain about as insulting, what about US (as in United States) Route 1, passing through Virginia being named after that traitor, Robert E Lee?  Some State Route would still be offensive to me, but not as offensive as this current naming.  You don't have to had family here 1,000 years ago to be offended by something.
  Yes, I grant you that some see him as a Virginia Patriot, but he turned his back on the United States, on the Union.

1 comment:

Neal said...

I would suggest that Lee is not a traitor. He is a distinguished graduate of West Point (#2 in his class) and went on to continue success in the Army Corps of Engineers. In fact, Lee was Lincoln's first choice to lead the Union Army and was called to DC to speak with Lincoln on that matter. He declined on principle. It is that declination that I judge to be more an act of patriotism and enjoyment of Constitutional perquisites. He was opposed to what was tantamount to a cynical condemnation of the ways and means of the South, to include slavery, a practice found in greater numbers in the North than the south, CT being one of the principle markets for arriving slaves. Most folks forget, or won't acknowledge that Lee didn't cause or even form The Confederacy. He WAS chosen to lead the Confederate Army, but like all military men, he did his duty as he saw it to be done. In that, I suggest that he was an honorable man.

Lee was the first of a long line of men who have dealt with the principle of "my country right or wrong, my country." Rather, he chose to oppose that which he felt was wrong..in much the same way as many of us oppose those things today that are wrong. The opposition is there for us.....but none of us is given an Army to lead.