Friday, July 8, 2016

The First Humans in the Western Hemisphere


For John, BLUFPeople keep learning more and more and they change what we thought was true.  Nothing to see here; just move along.



Who was here before the Native Americans?  That is not an idle question.  It could send archeology in new directions here in the United States, here in the Western Hemisphere. One place to look for a little bit of information is the Gault School of Archeological Research.

Here is an interesting paragraph from their web site:

Currently paleoindian archaeology is in what is scientifically known as a “paradigm shift” or a change in our basic assumptions. Evidence found to date suggests that the old hypothesis is no longer any good but no general consensus has yet arisen on a new one. Archaeologists are looking for new data that could confirm one or a combination of hypotheses that are being proposed. One important possibility is that early peoples could have come by boat down one or both sea coasts. We know that people reached Australia by boat nearly 50,000 years ago and were sailing in the Pacific off of Japan by 30,000 years ago.
As an additional thought, four and a half years ago The Washington Post had an article, " Radical theory of first Americans places Stone Age Europeans in Delmarva 20,000 years ago".  There was even a book, Across Atlantic Ice:  The Origin of America's Clovis Culture.  In my limited exploration of the Gault web site I did not see any indication of interest in this theory.

Hat tip to the InstaPundit.

Regards  —  Cliff

  No, not John Galt.  He was someone else.

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